Besides the LEPC, what local agencies may maintain specific information on industries in your community that use, store, or generate EHS-listed hazardous materials?

Besides the Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC), local police and fire departments are key agencies that may maintain specific information on industries in your community that use, store, or generate EHS-listed hazardous materials.

Local police departments play a crucial role in maintaining public safety, particularly in incidents involving hazardous materials. They work in tandem with fire departments to secure the scene of an incident, control traffic, and assist in evacuations if necessary. Their understanding of hazardous materials is vital for ensuring public order and safety during such emergencies. For instance, in the event of a chemical spill, police officers would establish perimeters and manage crowd control, relying on information about the hazardous material to make informed decisions about public safety.

Local fire departments are often the first responders to incidents involving hazardous materials. Their expertise in handling such materials is critical for the immediate containment and control of the situation. Firefighters are trained to identify and mitigate the risks associated with hazardous substances, and they use information about these materials to inform their response strategies.

Both local police and fire departments are essential components of the Incident Command System (ICS), a standardized approach to the command, control, and coordination of emergency response. In the ICS framework, these departments work collaboratively, with the fire department typically leading efforts in hazardous materials incidents, and the police department providing necessary support and security.